Mask and figure

Bronze, 1976, H: 90cm, Nasjonalmuseet for kunst, arkitektur og design

Danish-born Sonja Ferlov Mancoba (1911-1984) was one of the most distinctive and significant Scandinavian sculptors of the 20th century. Together with many fellow artists of her generation, she followed the leading international art trends during the 1930s – in particular Surrealism. Their contributions laid the groundwork for a unique abstract art in Denmark, and towards the end of the decade engendered the growth of an expressionistic spontaneous abstract painting, which later formed the basis of the pan-European Cobra movement. At the same time there was a strong tendency towards a concrete and constructivist art form in post-war Danish art, which also had its roots in the art of the 30s. It was precisely in the borderline between these mutually opposing movements that Sonja Ferlov Mancoba carried out her artistic endeavours.

OWG

Mask sculpture

Bronze, 1938, H: 39cm, Nasjonalmuseet for kunst, arkitektur og design

The sculptor Sonja Ferlov Mancoba (1911-1984) belonged to a group of Danish artists – often referred to as ”the spontaneous abstractionists” – that would come to have a great influence on the Danish art scene during the 30s and 40s, and eventually also on a broader European art world.

She worked in an idiom that straddled the surrealist and constructivist movements, and she exhibited clear references to non-Western, ”primitive” art throughout her artistic practice. Her interest in a prehistoric aesthetic is particularly visible in the early, yet important workMask Sculpturefrom 1939. Here she introduces the mask motif into her art for the first time, a seminal motif that she returns to and deals with throughout her career.

OWG

Élan vers l\'avenir

Bronze, 1965, H: 75cm, Nasjonalmuseet for kunst, arkitektur og design

Sculpture

Bronze, 1937, H: 28cm, Nasjonalmuseet for kunst, arkitektur og design

Consentration

Bronze, 1961, H: 58cm, Nasjonalmuseet for kunst, arkitektur og design

The Warrior

Bronse, 1967, H: 27cm, Nasjonalmuseet for kunst, arkitektur og design